About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
or bare ron yes yes, you'd be hard pressed to find a person less ready to be involved in negotiations. anyone who reads here understands this. >> i mentioned -- that's just the structure that has evolved to deal with the issue, and the europeans -- the foreign minister of the european union takes that position as representing the european union, and other countries are represented. ordinarily by political directors. they don't have to be but that's how the issue evolved. so some of these strictures are continuity. they evolve and persist. who comes into that and the personalities that come to that are the function of those particular organizations. in that's case it's the european union. we tend to focus on who is on the other side of the table, the british representative or the american representative. the problem with the p-5, is who is on the other side of the table. these negotiations are stalemated, not because lady ashton because -- because of this limitation and because of the approach they have had on these issues. i think the stalemate of these conversations should be directe
not in the next 30 seconds but that's a good question you have asked. we'll move on to ron in elizabeth, indiana. ron? caller: i'd like to say that in my opinion, hillary clinton or any other very rich person being in office would be probably the worst possible case scenario for this country. i think that it's about time that some normal person, woman or man, be elected to office so that instead of serving corporate interests as our presidents have up to now, we would have some interest for the people. host: ron in elizabeth, indiana. from facebook. host: and here's some twitter comments. host: robert, north carolina, republican line. robert? caller: after this term of four years with the democrats, i don't think she's got a chance. i'm a business owner. more years of this, i'll be out of business. host: what kind of business do you have? caller: i do grading work, bulldozers. host: how has business been the last couple of years? caller: bad. i'm struggling to stay in business. i don't know what to look forward to, i can't hardly say in -- stay in business. an the democrats in this country, i th
and charlotte would think of us if they were here. >> good morning, i'm congressman ron barber from southern arizona. currently completing the term that was served by congresswoman giffords. i come to this issue from a number of perspectives. on january 8, 2011, i was standing beside the congresswoman as her district director when a gunman charged forward and opened up. i saw him shoot the congresswoman, and i decided that day judge john roll died and my colleague gabe zimmerman died, in 45 seconds 30 bullets were discharged from one clip. 45 seconds, 19 people were down. six of them died. that was an extended clip. the gunman had another one in his pocket and two shorter ones in his pocket, and had it not been for the quick action, courageous action of people there, he would have loaded and 30 more bullets would have been discharged. i come to this issue as a parent and a grandparent. i was on my way to the rural part of my district on friday when i heard the news about the shootings in connecticut. first i heard three had died, that was bad enough, then i heard 20 children had died. and i
much for allowing us to be part of the program. >> thank you, ron. [applause] >> thank you so much, ron. and for more than 40 years, the u.s. forest service and architect of the capitol have partnered to bring a christmas tree to the capitol from one of our nation's 155 national forests. i would like to specifically thank the dedicated forest service staff from both here in washington and in colorado who helped make this event possible. and let's give them a round of applause. [applause] >> joining us this evening is the honorable sherman, under secretary for natural resources and environment at the u.s. department of agriculture. he has a holiday message to share with you as well. [applause] >> speaker boehner, senators udall and bennett, congressman tipton and distinguished guests, on behalf of the secretary, tom vilsack and our chief of the forest service, i would like to say a few words if i can. each year, the capitol christmas tree comes from the u.s. forest service, which is an agency within usda and eachier we -- each year we select that tree from a different forest. this tree i
- men feed sell the ponderosa to the japanese slap leather go on, ron just about to go myself turn the world into a tv show it is the same game wherever you go one big advertisement for the status quo as if you knew how the story ends as if you are not sitting in a room alone and there was somebody real at the end of the telephone somebody real just about to dial your number ♪ get all worked up go back to war tie that yellow ribbon a side of fries big mac norman i usedn' to love a parade big mac falafel just about to go myself ♪ \[applause] "big mac falafel" in the code for the oversimplification of the arab world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time to think that you could fix and watch with a hammer. yeah, so we did. we went on the road and in many ways had our faith in the american process and our country restored by meeting some wonderful, committed people, who really mean extremely well and have the future of this country in their hearts and minds. but we raised the better part of $10 million, and it ain't right, you know? i do not know a lot about elect
followed folks who love this institution who really knew its rules. people like billy pitts and ron lash and jim oliver and j.l. cullen and peggy and tim who are here tonight. they care about not only the institution but the people on both sides of the aisle to make sure this place runs the way it should. you know, there's an old saying, it's nice to be important but it's more important to be nice. jay, you're both. you really have. you care about the people's house, the u.s. house of representatives, and we are so grateful for your decades of service and yes, jay, you look just the same. god bless. mr. woodall: i thank the gentleman, mr. speaker. it's my pleasure to yield to the new secretary of the republican conference, the gentlelady from north carolina, ms. foxx. ms. foxx: i thank my colleague from georgia for yielding time and giving me the opportunity to pay a very small tribute to jay pearson. mr. speaker, it's with mixed emotions that i rise to join my colleagues in recognizing jay pearson who served the house of representatives with dedication and vigor, vigor for the better pa
: ron tweets in -- guest: the foreclosure inventory remains large. it has been diminishing in the past couple of years. the peak was in 2010. 2011 was lower. 2012 is lower. we have about 22% of all transactions classified as distressed, either short sells. -- peter foreclosures or short sells. it had been one third of all transactions a couple of years ago. the distressed property transaction went even further next year, maybe 10% or 15% of all transactions. the market is healing. we are not back to normal by any means. but it is moving in the right direction. host: we have a tweet from liz smith. guest: the market has recovered. the factors that contribute to the recovery helped. the job creation and the bursting out of household formation. this is where many of the adults are living with their parents. that is reducing housing demand. we're seeing many young adults branching out. sometimes they are going into rentals. people do not want to pay higher rents. they want to be locked in at 30-year fixed rate mortgages. host: vincent in connecticut. caller: good morning. thank you for app
on until january. host: good morning, ron. you are on the air. caller: we are not looking at the right thing. like the congressman and the lobbyist. they are not putting any skin in the game. they are not making sacrifices. look at what their pensions are or social security. why do we have a limit on rates -- this is too much money. how about we spend as much money as we make? look at the money you'll save. host: robert levinson? guest: the caller is right about the united states spending as much as the next 17 nations combined. many of our allies like france and england. the united states is a global power with global responsibilities. it is a real sense of debate. our budgets tends to come down after we fight wars. what is the appropriate role for the united states military in the world? maybe allies can take care of this and maybe we do not need to do. host: how much do we spend? guest: about $600 billion a year from year to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across
more comfortable with. there are other changes they might be more comfortable with. host: ron has this suggestion from our twitter page. guest: that is a term we heard. when the cut health care, someone will be bearing the cut.t of that kin that is similar to the concept of those care organizations. they also include quality metrics as part of the contract, where they look at people's outcomes. one way to prevent against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors.
exists. people like former presidential candidate ron paul, his son rand paul -- them and a bunch of other people disagree with that. they are intended to bring that view into the marketplace of ideas. i am here to tell you that that is not where the center of gravity is. right now, america does have a unique role in the world, we are the guarantor of security in several regions and a lot of countries depend on that. if we're going to change that whole system and diversified power and take america out of the role of policing the world, that is a possibility, but i do not see it happening. host: a question. if the president was not watching in real time, the national security adviser should have been. why didn't he tell the president? guest: we know the president was told about it, he was aware of it as it was going on. the first wave of attacks happened in a wave of 30 minutes. there is a lot of unanswered questions, not just what the president should be doing, but what about the national security adviser? these are two men who have responsibility for the whole world. what about t
does not have land use restrictions. host: denver, colorado, ron. republican women. -- republican. caller: good morning. it seems like the community reinvestment act that was passed in 1975 more or less laid the foundation for the housing bubble as that was the beginning of the sub-prime. that evolves and was expanded upon. business took advantage of it. because of that we get the ball. the -- bubble. the cra is still on the books, and sub-prime loans are still being made. i was wondering, do you think a major part of the foundation was the community reinvestment act and ended should be eliminated? he called the community reinvestment act, i do not think it had as big or roll was people like to say. housing was already expensive in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there w
to them, the better. host: our guest is of the harvard school. ron has another point of view -- guest: one of the complicated things about this is the fiscal cliff actually is deficit- reduction. as a group concerned about big deficits and trying to find ways to reduce the deficit, you look at the fiscal cliff and you think, it actually does have the kind of changes we need to be talking about. it would have more revenue and spending cuts. the concern we have and that is prompted by ben bernanke or the congressional budget office or lot of outsiders, looking at the way the fiscal cliff is structured, where finds that it actually has too much debt as a production, and i say that as someone who generally does not worry about too much depth as a production, because politicians are so unlikely to reduce the deficit much, but if we went over the cliff, there would be in too what steps the production. takes a wax and domestic discretionary spending -- it takes a big whack at domestic discretionary spending. so we should replace the fiscal cliff with more thoughtful deficit-reduction. make sure t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)